Sunday, November 08, 2020

Digital Desk Staff

An extra €10 million is being made available for palliative and end of life care this year.

The money will be divided among groups around the country, including €8.5 million for members of the Voluntary Hospice Group.

Home care services in the south-east will receive €350,000 in funding and the Laura Lynn Hospice in Lepordstown will receive €750,000.

The Irish Hospice Foundation, the All Ireland Institute of Hospice and Palliative Care, the Jack and Jill Foundation and the Irish Cancer Society will also split €400,000 of the funds.

Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly says the money is aimed at offsetting the challenges posed by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Earlier this week, Mr Donnelly also confirmed changes for doctors from non-EEA countries who wish to work in Ireland.

The move will mean doctors who qualify in a non-EEA country and come to Ireland to complete their postgraduate medical training will no longer have to complete an internship equivalent to one completed in Ireland.

Previously, only internships taken in Australia, New Zealand, Sudan, Malaysia, Pakistan and South Africa met the equivalent requirement.

In a statement issued on Friday, Mr Donnelly said: “Ireland’s health service has, for many years, been supported by highly skilled and caring doctors from across the world.

“Until now, many of those doctors who trained outside the EEA have been ineligible to apply for specialist training in this country.

“I appreciate that this has been very frustrating for them as they sought to build their lives and careers here. I am pleased that this barrier has now been removed and I know that this step will be welcomed by all of those in the medical profession.”

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